Glassdoor’s Diversity and Inclusion Workplace Survey

Glassdoor’s vision is a world where workplace transparency leads to more inclusive company cultures and where every employee is treated equitably. Everyone deserves to work in a place where they can truly be themselves and feel like they belong, and understanding the state of diversity and inclusion (“D&I”) at a company is key. According to a new Glassdoor survey conducted by The Harris Poll, job seekers and employees report that disparities still exist within companies concerning experiences with and perceptions of diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace. Glassdoor’s D&I workplace survey underscores how important D&I is to job seekers and employees today, revealing the differences among underrepresented groups and the talent employers may miss out on if they don’t embrace transparency around D&I. Today, we launched new product features that deliver greater transparency into the current state of diversity, equity, and inclusion within companies.

These new product features come as 3 in 4 (76%) job seekers and employees today report that a diverse workforce is an important factor when evaluating companies and job offers. These features are part of Glassdoor’s public commitment from our CEO, Christian Sutherland-Wong leveraging its product and resources to help achieve equity in and out of the workplace. To help end inequality, shine a light on inequities in the workplace, and anonymously share your demographics to help pinpoint pay and diversity disparities, here.

The vast majority of employees and job seekers today are paying attention to the state of D&I at companies. Access to D&I insights, trends and data is a crucial step in the job search process. If job seekers and employees don’t have access to D&I information to make informed decisions about where to work, employers risk losing quality and diverse talent that otherwise may have contributed to their company’s success. 

“Many companies have been making commitments around D&I in recent months, but now job seekers and employees want to see action and a real change from employers,” said Glassdoor Chief People Officer, Carina Cortez. “It’s critical to understand how different groups look at D&I from their own work experiences, reinforcing the overdue need for all employers to improve when it comes to diversity, inclusion, and belonging in the workplace.” 

The survey found that among U.S. employees and job seekers: 

Diversity & inclusion is an important factor for the majority of today’s job seekers, but more so for underrepresented groups. However, inequities still exist as more Black and Hispanic employees have quit jobs due to discrimination.

  • More than 3 in 4 employees and job seekers (76%) report a diverse workforce is an important factor when evaluating companies and job offers. 
    • About 4 in 5 Black (80%), Hispanic (80%), and LGBTQ (79%) job seekers and employees report a diverse workforce is an important factor when evaluating companies and job offers.
  • Nearly half of Black (47%) and Hispanic (49%) job seekers and employees have quit a job after witnessing or experiencing discrimination at work, significantly higher than white (38%) job seekers and employees.
  • 71% of employees would be more likely to share experiences and opinions on diversity & inclusion at their company if they could do so anonymously.

Job seekers and employees want employers to step up their transparency around D&I. If employers don’t, they will miss out on diverse talent. 

  • Significantly more Black (71%) and Hispanic (72%) employees say their employer should be doing more to increase the diversity of its workforce than white (58%) employees.
  • About 1 in 3 employees and job seekers (32%) would not apply to a job at a company where there is a lack of diversity among its workforce.
    • But, this is significantly higher for Black (41%) job seekers and employees when compared to white (30%) job seekers and employees, and among LGBTQ (41%) job seekers and employees when compared to non-LGBTQ (32%) job seekers and employees.
  • Nearly 2 in 5 employees and job seekers (37%) would not apply to a job at a company where there are disparities in employee satisfaction ratings among different ethnic/racial groups.
  • 2 in 3 employees and job seekers (66%) trust employees the most when it comes to understanding what diversity & inclusion really looks like at a company, significantly higher than senior leaders (19%), the company’s website (9%), and recruiters (6%).

Among U.S. Employees and job seekers…

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*Among U.S. Employees only

“It’s not a surprise to see that the most trustworthy source of information around the state of D&I at a company is its employees,” said Cortez. “It’s important to listen to employee feedback, the good and the bad, to drive change that creates a workplace where everyone feels equally valued and respected.”

When it comes to understanding what diversity and inclusion is really like at a company, who do employees and job seekers trust most?

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“It’s critical to understand how important diversity and inclusion is to employees and job seekers today,” said Cortez. “Employers have to be transparent about their commitments to D&I, otherwise, they’ll miss out on hiring quality and diverse talent. And it’s not just about words, it’s about taking action to drive meaningful change.”

U.S. employees and job seekers would not apply to a job at a company…

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Survey Methodology:
This survey was conducted online within the United States by The Harris Poll on behalf of Glassdoor from August 25-31, 2020 among 2,745 U.S. adults ages 18 and older who are either currently employed or are not employed but looking for work. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables and subgroup sample sizes, please contact pr@glassdoor.com.

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